The Metropolitans, by Carol Goodman

The Metropolitans, by Carol Goodman has all of the classic elements of a great children’s book: a quest, danger, friendship, and magic. Like all truly great stories, what makes this story special is the fact that within the fantasy and the fiction the characters take on some of life’s most veritable, and universally painful struggles: loss, alienation, fear, and shame. However, Goodman takes this one step further by weaving in just enough factual elements and places to make the story seem not only believable, but real as well.

Advertisements

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, By Susan Cain

In short, Susan Cain’s Quiet is the definitive owners guide to the introverted personality, and as such, is a must read for anyone who is, or loves, an introvert. As an undergraduate, and again as a graduate student in Psychology, I enjoyed the required courses on personality theory. Even if most of the theories discussed… Continue reading Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, By Susan Cain

Beauty: A Retelling of the Story of Beauty and the Beast, By Robin McKinley

Just as in the classic version of Beauty in the Beast, this story is about a young woman who is imprisoned by a beast in an enchanted castle in her father’s stead. However, unlike every other version of this story I have read, in this story Beauty is not beautiful. Instead, she is a tall… Continue reading Beauty: A Retelling of the Story of Beauty and the Beast, By Robin McKinley

Into the Heart of Borneo, By Redmond O’Hanlon

Upon my first cursory inspection this book sounded like manna from heaven. It met all the criteria of a great adventure story.

The Girl Who Drank the Moon, By Kelly Barnhill

The Girl Who Drank the Moon is a timely story that warns against ignorance, the danger of unchecked sorrow, the strength required to walk a path separate from the expected, and above all, the importance of always asking questions. While the author wrote the story with a 5th grade reader in mind, like any truly good children’s book, I think it would be equally enjoyable for adults, even though they may not read the same story between the covers.